Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Matt Jeffries' first concept drawings for the Starship Enterprise in 1965. Gene Roddenberry rejected these as being too "fairy-like" and "insubstantial". They were later used by the Star Trek franchise as the design of one of the first warp-one capable starships, also named Enterprise.





Matt Jeffries' second set of concept drawings for the Starship Enterprise in 1965. Jeffries felt that the sphere was the easiest way to maintain pressure in space.

Gene Roddenberry rejected these as being too bulky, although he liked the nacelles. They were later used by the Star Trek franchise as the design of the Olympic-class starship. Captain Beverly Crusher, MD, commanded one of these, the USS Pasteur.





Matt Jeffries' third set of concept drawings for the Starship Enterprise in 1965. He went back to the idea of an airfoil-like shape to generate the warp bubble around the ship. He disliked the idea of a saucer section, because it seemed too much like the "flying saucer". Gene Roddenberry very much wanted a saucer, however.

Jeffries also toyed with the idea of a shuttlecraft being attached to the exterior skin of the ship, somehow, rather than in a hangar bay or some interior section. His feeling is that starships would be too bulky to enter an atmosphere, whereas a shuttlecraft would be sleek and aerodynamic.

Elements of this design were later used by the Star Trek franchise as second-generation Romulan warbirds.





Matt Jeffries' fourth set of concept drawings for the Starship Enterprise in 1965. He incorporated Roddenberry's love of nacelles and saucers, but Jeffries preferred the design with the saucer down below rather than on top.

Gene Roddenberry liked the one with the saucer on top, and approved it for final revisions.





Matt Jeffries' final concept drawing for the Starship Enterprise in 1965. This color drawing was the one which got approval from Gene Roddenberry, producer Herb Solow, and NBC executives.

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