Tuesday, October 22, 2013

MORE HORROR CINEMA TRIVIA!!!!!!! As always, answers after the cut. No one tried to answer my first quiz, such is the pity...


1. Ben Carre, set designer for The Phantom of the Opera (1925), actually once worked at the Paris Opera -- an experience which helped him design the great sets for this film.

a. True
b. False


2. The mummy's name, Ardath Bey, in 1931's The Mummy (1925), was purposefully chosen because it is an anagram for the phrase "death by Ra."

a. True
b. False


3. 1931's The Mummy was originally about a magician called "Cagliostro" who claimed that he had lived for centuries. It was hastily rewritten after the discovery of King Tut's tomb to take advantage of the public's sudden fascination with Egyptian relics, and was called "Im-Ho-Tep" until just prior to its release.

a. True
b. False


4. A lengthy scene in 1931's The Mummy showed the reincarnation of Imhotep and Princess Ankh-sen-Amon through the ages, but was cut. This pissed off:
a. Star Zita Johann, who firmly believed in reincarnation.
b. Star Boris Karloff, since this constituted the majority of his scenes.
c. Director Karl Freund, who wrote these scenes.
d. No one! They never filmed any such crap!


5. James Whale's 1932 classic, The Old, Dark House, credits "John Dudgeon" as Sir Roderick Femm. This is a surprise, as:
a. The actor playing Sir Roderick is actually Elspeth Dudgeon -- a woman!
b. It's really Charles Laughton, in his first American film.
c. There is no Sir Roderick Femm in the film (the scenes of this actor were cut).
d. It was supposed to read "John Gielgud," but the name was horribly misspelled by a studio hack.


6. The Old, Dark House (1932) was pulled from release in 1963 when William Castle's remake came out. The film was not shown again until 1994 because:
a. Castle owned the rights, and refused the original to be shown for 30 years.
b. The few remaining prints of the 1932 version were lost forever, until a collector discovered one final copy in the eaerly 1990s.
c. James Whale refused to let it be re-released, and he did not die until the 1990s.
d. It could only be shown in Great Britian due to copyright issues.



7. Cat People (1942) got very poor critical reviews when it opened on November 13, 1942, but very positive reviews toward the end of its lengthy run in theaters. Why?
a. RKO paid a number of reviewers to do good reviews.
b. The start of World War II led critics to praise the portrayal of Irina, whom they now saw as a Serbian "freedom fighter."
c. Most critics never actually saw the film, and panned it solely because it had a low budget (just $150,000).
d. The film's lengthy run in theaters allowed critics to see it again, and they re-assessed it quite positively after that.


8. The most terrifying scene in Cat People (1942) is the pool scene, where the monster threatens Alice Moore. What little we see of the monster is created by:
a. Director Jacques Tourneur waving his hands in front of some lights.
b. Animation provided for free by Disney animators (who had to be uncredited).
c. A hand-held camera (just like in "The Blair Witch Project").
d. Sound effects and nothing else.


9. Elizabeth Russell had a bit part in Cat People (1942) as the mysterious Serbian woman who speaks to Irina Dubrovna during her engagement party in the restaurant. She had another small role in a very famous horror film. In what?
a. She was the old lady in the turret in 1977's The Sentinel.
b. She played Mary Shelley in 1939's Bride of Frankenstein.
c. She posed as Mary Meredith, the woman in the painting, in 1944's The Uninvited.
d. She reprised her role in 1944's Return of the Cat People.


10. Gail Russell ("Stella Meredith") co-starred with Cornelia Otis Skinner ("Miss Holloway") in 1944's The Uninvited. Russell had another connection to Skinner. What was it?
a. She was Skinner's real-life daughter.
b. She was Skinner's student when Skinner was a teacher years earlier.
c. She portrayed Skinner (a well-known author in real life!) in the 1944 film Our Hearts Were Young and Gay.
d. She reprised Skinner's role in the Broadway production.


Horror Cinema Quiz Answers - Behind the link!!





1. Ben Carre, set designer for The Phantom of the Opera (1925), actually once worked at the Paris Opera -- an experience which helped him design the great sets for this film.
a. True
b. False


2. The mummy's name, Ardath Bey, in 1931's The Mummy (1925), was purposefully chosen because it is an anagram for the phrase "death by Ra."
a. True
b. False


3. 1931's The Mummy was originally about a magician called "Cagliostro" who claimed that he had lived for centuries. It was hastily rewritten after the discovery of King Tut's tomb to take advantage of the public's sudden fascination with Egyptian relics, and was called "Im-Ho-Tep" until just prior to its release.
a. True
b. False


4. A lengthy scene in 1931's The Mummy showed the reincarnation of Imhotep and Princess Ankh-sen-Amon through the ages, but was cut. This pissed off:
a. Star Zita Johann, who firmly believed in reincarnation.
b. Star Boris Karloff, since this constituted the majority of his scenes.
c. Director Karl Freund, who wrote these scenes.
d. No one! They never filmed any such crap!


5. James Whale's 1932 classic, The Old, Dark House, credits "John Dudgeon" as Sir Roderick Femm. This is a surprise, as:
a. The actor playing Sir Roderick is actually Elspeth Dudgeon -- a woman!
b. It's really Charles Laughton, in his first American film.
c. There is no Sir Roderick Femm in the film (the scenes of this actor were cut).
d. It was supposed to read "John Gielgud," but the name was horribly misspelled by a studio hack.


6. The Old, Dark House (1932) was pulled from release in 1963 when William Castle's remake came out. The film was not shown again until 1994 because:
a. Castle owned the rights, and refused the original to be shown for 30 years.
b. The few remaining prints of the 1932 version were lost forever, until a collector discovered one final copy in the early 1990s.
c. James Whale refused to let it be re-released, and he did not die until the 1990s.
d. It could only be shown in Great Britian due to copyright issues.


7. Cat People (1942) got very poor critical reviews when it opened on November 13, 1942, but very positive reviews toward the end of its lengthy run in theaters. Why?
a. RKO paid a number of reviewers to do good reviews.
b. The start of World War II led critics to praise the portrayal of Irina, whom they now saw as a Serbian "freedom fighter."
c. Most critics never actually saw the film, and panned it solely because it had a low budget (just $150,000).
d. The film's lengthy run in theaters allowed critics to see it again, and they re-assessed it quite positively after that.


8. The most terrifying scene in Cat People (1942) is the pool scene, where the monster threatens Alice Moore. What little we see of the monster is created by:
a. Director Jacques Tourneur waving his hands in front of some lights.
b. Animation provided for free by Disney animators (who had to be uncredited).
c. A hand-held camera (just like in "The Blair Witch Project").
d. Sound effects and nothing else.


9. Elizabeth Russell had a bit part in Cat People (1942) as the mysterious Serbian woman who speaks to Irina Dubrovna during her engagement party in the restaurant. She had another small role in a very famous horror film. In what?
a. She was the old lady in the turret in 1977's The Sentinel.
b. She played Mary Shelley in 1939's Bride of Frankenstein.
c. She posed as Mary Meredith, the woman in the painting, in 1944's The Uninvited.
d. She reprised her role in 1944's Return of the Cat People.


10. Gail Russell ("Stella Meredith") co-starred with Cornelia Otis Skinner ("Miss Holloway") in 1944's The Uninvited. Russell had another connection to Skinner. What was it?
a. She was Skinner's real-life daughter.
b. She was Skinner's student when Skinner was a teacher years earlier.
c. She portrayed Skinner (a well-known author in real life!) in the 1944 film Our Hearts Were Young and Gay.
d. She reprised Skinner's role in the Broadway production.

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